Monthly Archives: July 2015

THE BEST AND WORST DESSERTS

Let’s face it, were all going to cave in to temptation. We look forward to our snacks; they keep us going on difficult days and through tough times. But it doesn’t mean we can’t exert some control over the situation. Knowledge, that’s the key. With the right info we can make better decisions. Better decisions lead to weight control. To do that you need the facts. Well, here they are: the best and the worst.

 

Best                             Cal.      Fat (grm)      Worst       Cal.    Fat (grm)

AuBon Pair fresh      90           0          Cinnabun      670                 34

fruit cup

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Haagen-Dazs           120            0        McDonald’s    1010                29 sorbet                                                     shake (large)

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Aunti Anne’s          340             1      Au Bon Pair      630               42    original pretzel                                     croissant

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Starbuck’s              140            1         Dairy Queen        450               62

cappuccino16 oz.                             chocolate dipped double cone

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Au Bon Pair             280        4

choc. Cake

Starbuck’s mocha 20oz.                              600               25

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THE RESTAURANT HALL OF FAME / SHAME

 

 

There are plenty of pitfalls out there. It’s a minefield. But I’ve got a map you can follow to avoid disaster. There are always good alternatives – even in the fast-food jungle. Think of me as your personal trainer. We’ll fight the good fight together.

Fame                                    Cal.      Fat (grms)              Shame               Cal.      Fat (arms)

 

Subway’s 7 subs w/                260             5          Cheese fries with.       3010                217 Low fat  ranch dress

Blimpie’s veggie                      400             7         Movie theater            1640                126 Max sub                                                                      popcorn

McDonald’s fruit                     380            5         Prime ribs 16 oz.         1280                94 And yogurt parfait with granóla

Turkey sandwich                    370             6        Fettuccini alfredo        1500                97 With lettuce, tomato and mustard

Grilled or broiled

Chicken or seafood                270               8        Stuffed potato skins    1260                95                                                                                     with sour cream

Szechwan shrimp

or chicken w/rice                    930           19        Fudge brownie

Sunday                        1130                57

Chicken, lamb or

pork w/rice                              750             19     Beef and cheese

nachos w/sour cream    1360

Pasta with red clam sauce     870           20        Denny’s meat              1150                93

lover’s skillet

 

Fajitas chicken or shrimp        840          24        Carrot cake                 1560                84

w/ Vegetables

 

COMPARING FAST FOOD CHOICES

COMPARING FAST FOOD CHOICES

 

Restaurant                  Menu item                        Fat Grams       Total Calories          Fat %

Burger King                Ocean Perch Fish Fillet          33                             502                  50

Jack-in-the Box          Chicken Supreme                   42                              670                  50

White Castle                Fish Sandwich w/ tarter        13                             422                  50

Roy Rogers                 Chicken Breast                       24                                412                  50

McDonald’s                 Chicken McNuggets (1)         15                              270                  50

Kentucky F.C.             Rôtisserie Chicken                  19                             335                  50

Jack-in-the-Box          Fish Supreme                         32                             590                  40

Kentucky F.C.             Chicken Breast                       34                              480                  40

Kentucky F.C.             Skinfree Crispy                       16                              329                  40

Shonney’s                   Chicken Tenders                    20                               488                  40

McDonald’s                 Filet-O-Fish                             18                              370                  40

McDonald’s                 McChicken                             20                                415                  40

Wendy’s                      Chicken Club                          25                                520                  40

Taco Bell                     Chicken Soft Taco (one)        21                              480                  40

Jack-in-the-Box          Grilled Chicken Fillet          30                              420                  42

Jack-in-the-Box          Chicken Fahlita                       8                               189                  31

White Castle                Chicken Sandwich                  7                                212                  30

Pollo Loco                   Chicken Breast                       8                                 234                  30

Burger King                 Fettuccini Chicken                  11                             238                  30

El Pollo Loco               Chicken Burrito                       7                               310                  30

Taco Bell                     Chicken Burrito                       12                               334                  31

White Castle                Fish Sandwich                          5                               158                  28

Hardees                      Chicken Breast                          3                                310                  27

Wendy’s                      Chicken Sandwich                  7                                  290                  21

Ponderosa                   Chicken Breast                       2                                 288                  18

 

 

If you have found our articles helpful, please visit Amazon to buy our books and support our good work.

Right now the following are available:

“Why we eat and why we keep eating: breaking your food addiction

“The Prefect Day.”

“The Caffeine Diet: sipping your way to slim”

Coming on or about 7/20/2015:

“Turning off the hunger gene: food as medicine in the 21st century”

Coming on or about 8/1/2015

“Warning!  everything you’ve ever heard about dieting is wrong”

 

27 SNACKS THAT CAN KEEP YOU FROM BINGEING

 The following twenty-seven snacks supply approximately 100 calories each and help fill you up without filling up out. By keeping your blood sugar up, they will keep your appetite in check until your next meal. Never wait until you are hungry; by then, you have low blood sugar and the brain is screaming for food – especially in the form of sugar.

1- Ten-ounce glass of vanilla soymilk (93 calories).

2- Six ounces nonfat, plain yogurt (94 calories).

3 – One cup free-squeezed orange juice (111 calories).

4 – Garbanzo cilantro dip (96 calories).

5 – Two cups of fresh blueberries (102 calories).

6 – Two cups cantaloupe cubes, drizzled with lime juice (12 calories).

7 – Two cups fresh strawberries (108 calories).

8- One banana, sliced and sprinkled with nutmeg (104 calories).

9- One slice whole-wheat toast with I teaspoon apricot preserves (98.4 calories).

10 – One whole-wheat bagel (small) with 1-teaspoon fat-free cream cheese (102 calories).

11 -Two cups fresh spinach sautéed in 1-tep. olive oil with 2 garlic cloves (102 calories).

12 – One medium sweet potato, sliced into strips and baked until crispy (117 calories).

13 – 2 cups asparagus sautéed in 2 teaspoons soy sauce and 2 tablespoons chicken broth (97.6 calories).

14-2 cups tossed salad with I medium sliced tomato, 2 tablespoons kidney beans, and 1 tablespoon of oil-free dressing (107 calories).

15 – One cup steamed corn kernels mixed with 1/3 cup chopped sweet red peppers (101 calories).

16 – One slice whole wheat French bread (96 calories).

17 – Three and a quarter cups air-popped popcorn (107 calories).

18 – One cup mango slices (107 calories).

19 – 2 cups of slightly steamed yellow zucchini, cut into rounds and salted (101 calories).

20 – Twenty-six baby carrots (98.8 calories).

21 – One cup tomato soup made with ЛА cup soymilk and ЛА cup water (111 calories).

22 -Two ounces water-packed tuna, drained and mixed with 2 teaspoons fat-free mayonnaise, and served on 2 whole-wheat crackers (98.8 calories).

23 – One cup shredded cabbage and 1-ounce firm-cubed tofu sautéed in 2 teaspoons peanut sauce. Top with 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro (105 calories).

24 – One whole-wheat pita in 1/3 cup fat-free refried beans with I teaspoon salsa (105 calories).

25 – One tablespoon orange juice concentrate, one banana, and 2 apricot halves blended to

make a smoothie (97.2 calories).

26 – Two cups cooked brown rice mixed with 3 tablespoons cooked black beans seasoned

with cumin, salt, and pepper. (96.6 calories).

27 – One-half protein shake made in the morning. 125 calories

 

If you have found our articles helpful, please visit Amazon to buy our books and support our good work.

Right now the following are available:

“Why we eat and why we keep eating: breaking your food addiction

“The Prefect Day.”

“The Caffeine Diet: sipping your way to slim”

Coming in three weeks:

“Turning off the hunger gene: food as medicine in the 21st century”

“Warning!  everything you’ve ever heard about dieting is wrong”

 

TEN FOODS THAT CAN SABOTAGE YOUR DIET

Lookout for these foods. They can sabotage even the best diet. I know some of these have been your old friends. Well, it’s time to make new friends!

1) Pasta: It may be fat-free, but it contains 40 grams of carbs per level cup. That’s enough to set off an insulin reaction and throw the appetite into over-eat mode. If you want to eat pasta, add half a cup of low-fat vegetables to increase fiber and slow digestion. Grapes: Because grapes contain little fiber and lots of glucose, they can cause both an insulin reaction and trigger the release of endorphins, thereby continuing the eating process. Choose bananas, apples, and strawberries, which have more fiber and more fructose, a slower reacting sugar.

2) Rice Products: Instant white rice is rated 91 on the glycemic scale. With no fiber due to refining, it breaks down quickly into glucose, causing an insulin reaction and stimulating the appetite. Rice cakes, a popular snack food, are higher than white bread on the glycemic index. While plain ones are low in calories, most come coated with cheese, caramel, or apple flavoring, and it’s hard to stop after just a few.

3) Non-Lean Red Meat: A six-ounce serving of filet mignon can yield as much as 26 grams of fat. Eat the meat of only free-ranging animals. If these sources are not available or cost too much, concentrate on poultry, fish and tofu.

4) Cream Of Wheat: Is a fast-acting, high-glycemic carb that is usually accompanied by cinnamon and lots of added sugar. Try oats, cream of rye, and oatmeal instead.

5) Fruit Juice: Juices are devoid of fiber, which makes their sugars absorbed quickly into the system. Liquids take up little space in the stomach, exacerbating hunger, rather than satisfying it. Further, the body does not recognize the calories from liquids.

6) Raisins: They are too dense in carbs compared to other fruits (about 65 grams per half-cup). Raisins are so dense in sugar that they can rot your teeth out.

7) Bagels: A single bagel yields about 40 grams of carb; a large one 75 grams. And the 350-400 calories are as much as you should get from an entire small meal. Rye bread and oat bread are better alternatives (both are lower on the glycemic scale).

8) Cold Cereal: Most cereals are loaded with sugar. Only the high fiber, no sugar added cereals help suppress appetite.

9) Grains and beans (except soy): An article in the Wall Street Journal, February 23, 1989, described the dangers of consuming grains. It explained how many grain crops are infected with aflatoxin – a substance produced by asparilla rust – a fungus that infects corn and other grain crops. Aflatoxins have been linked to liver, pancreatic, and esophageal cancers in lab animals.

In 1998, 62% of the Texas corn crop tested exceeded government-approved levels of aflatoxin, and was deemed unfit for human consumption. Some samples exceeded government standards by as much as 50 times! Beans were also inedible before the Agricultural Revolution. Toxic compounds called alkaloids are found in all species of legumes, which include peanuts. These natural pesticides protect beans from predators. Some of these compounds include cyanogens such as cyanide. Fava plants (a type of bean) contain the toxins vicine, covicne, and isouramil. These toxins inhibit red blood cells from delivering oxygen to the various tissues of the body. Cooking legumes (beans and peas) breaks down most, but not all, toxins.

If you have found our articles helpful, please visit Amazon to buy our books and support our good work.

Right now the following are available:

“Why we eat and why we keep eating: breaking your food addiction

“The Prefect Day.”

“The Caffeine Diet: sipping your way to slim”

Coming in three weeks:

“Turning off the hunger gene: food as medicine in the 21st century”

“Warning!  everything you’ve ever heard about dieting is wrong”

 

THE HEALTHIEST FOODS IN THE WORLD

Place these foods Into your shopping cart every week, and you’re covered – for all the vitamins, minerals, omega-3s, phytochemicals, etc. that have been shown to have the greatest health benefits. Keep varying these choices so you work in some of everything each week, but don’t get hung up on record-keeping. My Favorite Foods List 1) Broccoli: One serving = two or more spears. Broccoli is the best one-stop vegetable choice for vitamins С and A, beta-carotene and fiber, according to Melinda Morris, R.D., spokesperson for the Colorado Dietetic Association. Plus, its reputation as a cancer fighter is true: it has a compound called sulforaphane, which has blocked the growth of breast tumors in mice. “The highest levels of sulforaphane are in the florets,” says Bronwyn G. Hughes, Ph.D., president of the Plant Bioactives Research Institute in Orem, Utah. Eat it raw for the most sulforaphane, but microwaving with a small amount of water retains up to 50 percent of it; boiling and steaming methods trail far behind, and commercially frozen broccoli has no detectable sulforaphane at all. 2) Carrots: One serving = two medium carrots. Studies show that the equivalent of two carrots every other day provides enough beta-carotene to reduce stroke risk by half for men who have already had symptoms of heart disease, and carrots cut women’s risk of stroke as well. 3) Chili Peppers: One serving = one or more peppers. The heat source in chilies, capsaicin, is an antioxidant with a multitude of benefits: It protects DNA against carcinogens; it’s a natural decongestant and expectorant; its blood-thinning ability helps prevent strokes; it lowers cholesterol and some researchers believe it stimulates the release of endorphins. 4) Spinach: One serving = one cup, uncooked. One cup of raw spinach provides a bumper crop of vitamin A, vitamin С and folic acid, plus a bit of magnesium, which helps control cancer, reduces risk of stroke and heart disease, blocks free radicals and may help prevent osteoporosis. Dark green, leafy vegetables also contain glutathione, which facilitates an enzyme that’s important to immune function. Fresh is best, as in salads; cooking leaves little glutathione. 5) Mushrooms: One serving = !4 cup dried shiitakes, etc. “The basic mushroom that Americans find in their produce section may not be that valuable, but wild exotic mushrooms contain betaglucan, which acts like a vaccine to kick the immune system into higher gear. Shiitake, enoki, zhu ling and reishi, a type of hard, woody mushroom that grows on tree trunks, all have anti-cancer and anti-viral effects. 6) Strawberries. Tomatoes: One serving = one fresh tomato or V* cup strawberries. In a study of plants related to longevity, researchers found that the two best fruits correlated with a longer life were tomatoes and strawberries. Tomatoes are rich in lycopenes, an antioxidant even more potent than vitamin С that also stimulates immune function and slows degenerative diseases. Tomatoes’ only drawback is soft skin that may harbor fungicides used in growing, but soaking in water helps flush them out. Strawberries contain ellagic acid, which has been shown to have anti-cancer properties. 7) Pineapple. Pavpava. Kiwi: One serving = one papaya, one cup pineapple or one to two kiwis. Enzymes, the catalysts that speed up the rate of digestion in the body, are found in high amounts in raw, fresh papaya, pineapple and kiwi, which help combat everything from autoimmune diseases, allergies and cancer to AIDS. Three papayas a day would provide the dose that has shown dramatic effects against disease, but you can get the same benefit from kiwi and pineapple. 8) Mangoes: One serving = one mango. Although rich in carotenoids, mangoes don’t have papaya’s high enzyme levels. But they do contain another important category of phytochemicals: bioflavonoids. Bioflavonoids help plants capture energy from the sun; when eaten, they aid our immune system, and their antioxidants are at least as effective as vitamin С and beta-carotene. 9) Citrus Fruits: One serving = one large orange or equivalent fruit. Fresh, whole citrus fruits are a great source of vitamin С (oranges have the most), which more than 30 studies have shown helps the body fight cancers of the lung, cervix, esophagus and stomach. They’re also extremely rich in bioflavonoids. The high concentration is in the white rind, the part between the colored skin and the fruit, which means when you drink orange juice, you’re getting little or no bioflavonoids. Limonene, another bioflavonoid found in the colored part of skin on citrus fruits, has been shown to be one of the most exciting phytochemicals in the fight against cancer—it helped reverse cancer in animal studies—but don’t eat the entire fruit, peel and all, because of sprayed-on pesticides. Try to eat fruits only in season. And remember that fruits contain a lot of sugars. If you’re trying to lose weight, go easy on the citrus. 10) Cantaloupe: One serving = %melon. One-quarter melon delivers 2 mg of beta-carotene—nearly half the National Cancer Institute’s recommended 5.7 mg per day for cancer prevention and a help in protecting against heart disease. Cantaloupe is also a rich source of vitamin C. 11) Apricots: One serving – three apricots. Fresh apricots are high in beta-carotene and provide medium-high vitamin С and some fiber. Vitamin С vanishes from dried apricots, and if they’re not organic, they lose beta-carotene as well. Non-organic dried apricots (and other dried fruits) retain their beta-carotene because they’re treated with sulfur dioxide, but the chemical can cause asthma in some people. 12) Banana: One serving = one medium. Bananas are rich in magnesium (shown to help protect the circulatory system), potassium and their simple sugars are more slowly absorbed. They’re also a good source of pectin, a soluble fiber that prevents radical swings in blood sugar. ^ 13) Garlic: One serving = two, three cloves fresh garlic, one teaspoon of garlic powder, four one gram powdered garlic tablets, four gel caps of Kyolic garlic or one teaspoon of liquid Kyolic garlic. “Garlic is a powerhouse of antioxidants,” says Jean Carper, syndicated food-nutrition columnist and author of Food – Your Miracle Medicine. “There have been lots of studies that show it lowers cholesterol and blood pressure, is an anti-viral and antibacterial, and it may have chemicals capable of destroying cancer cells, even after you get the cancer. Place unpeeled garlic cloves in a coffee cup, sprinkle with olive oil, cover with plastic wrap and microwave for about 30 seconds. Slip the peel off and eat a few with meals – it tastes somewhat like cashews. A bonus: less offensive garlic breath. 14) Soybeans and Tofu: One serving = one cup. Human infants have been fed soy protein-based formulas instead of milk for several generations. Since infants have a much higher amino-acid requirement per pound of bodyweight than adults, soy protein has already passed the most stringent test of all: growing a healthy baby. The infant formula industry has had to jump through so many regulatory hoops that the enormity of soy protein benefits has been lost – shuffled beneath mounds of paperwork and regulations. Some nutritionists feel that there is no single food more important than soybeans. They’re high in protein and complex carbohydrates, have both soluble and insoluble fiber, and they’re filling, cheap and taste good. Soybeans are loaded with phyto-chemicals and protease inhibitors that may help prevent cancer. Tofu, fresh soybeans, soy milk and soy protein isolates (a commercial product that’s 90 percent protein) lower “bad” LDL cholesterol levels in blood, which reduces heart disease risk. Even moderate amounts help, but the more people eat, the more dramatically their cholesterol drops. Soy is also high in a category of bioflavonoids that inhibit estrogen-promoted cancers and protect against radiation in chemotherapy. Studies have shown that regular soy eaters have reduced risk of prostate, colon, lung, rectal and stomach cancers. Alert: It’s been found that soy inhibits the body’s ability to absorb and utilize iodine. Iodine regulates the thyroid, and the thyroid controls metabolism. So, if you’ve been diagnosed with hypothyroidism (a slow metabolism), then limit soy-based dishes to twice a week. 15) Salmon: One serving = three ounces. In addition to salmon’s well-known heart-disease-fighting omega-3 oils, it’s got calcium, magnesium, complete proteins and В vitamins. Its B6 serves as another buffer against heart disease, and also boosts the immune system, stimulates an enzyme that regulates the nervous system and helps to prevent some cancers. Salmon has carotenoids, which account for its orange-pink color. Results of a research study by the World Health Organization show that the more fish people ate, the less likely they were to die from any cause, but especially heart disease and stroke. 16) Oats: One serving = one cup uncooked oats or oat meal; VA packets of instant oatmeal or VA cups oat flakes cereal. Researchers have found that oat bran lowers cholesterol and blood pressure and may also be beneficial in reducing the chances of colon cancer. Oatmeal contains both soluble and insoluble fiber, but it’s the soluble fiber in oatmeal that provides the most health benefits. 17) Quinoa: One serving =1/2 cup. A staple of the ancient Incas, it’s one of the best plant protein sources, with a complete selection of amino acids, high in calcium, fiber, phosphorus, iron and lysine. Quinoa can be cooked like rice (but doesn’t take as long!), or used as a flour for baking.

 

If you have found our articles helpful, please visit Amazon to buy our books and support our good work.

Right now the following are available:

“Why we eat and why we keep eating: breaking your food addiction

“The Prefect Day.”

“The Caffeine Diet: sipping your way to slim”

Coming in three weeks:

“Turning off the hunger gene: food as medicine in the 21st century”

“Warning!  everything you’ve ever heard about dieting is wrong”

 

MASTER PLAN FOR EATING OUT

 

 

Menus are never set in stone, and you’re never without options. Going out to eat doesn’t mean giving up your diet. Here are some restaurant rules:

1 – Check out the menu before walking in. See if there’s enough diversity for you and your companion(s).

2 – If the menu is vague or lacks detail, ask your server to explain it – to avoid surprises. Does the salad bar offer iceberg lettuce, or healthier varieties? Is the house salad topped with croutons or grilled chicken?

3 – Look for healthy or light menu selections.

4 – Don’t be shy about requesting changes. There is a lot more flexibility than you think. Restaurants can grill fish or meat rather just offer it fried. Toppings can be left off.

5 – Ask about substitutions. You may be able to replace coleslaw and fries with a side salad and baked potato – or have your omelet made with egg whites or egg substitutes -or you may elect for a light dressing instead of full fat.

6 – Watch for hidden fats. Order a cut of meat that is lower in fat, or one that can be trimmed. Lean steaks include filet mignon or sirloin as opposed to fatty porterhouse or prime rib.

7 – Use doggie bags to create tomorrow’s lunch. Get in the habit of taking home ЛА of what is served. Remember that portion sized have increased dramatically in recent years. You not only save calories but also the cost of tomorrow’s meal.

8- Beware buffets. It is easy to over eat to feel you are getting your money’s worth. Ordering a la carte is a healthier choice.

9 – Eat out less often. Brown bag from home or cruise the salad bar at the super market. If you are going on an outing, pack a cooler with protein-based sandwiches, yogurt and fruit. Your wallet as well as your waistline will than you.

10 – Have the waiter bring out only Уг of your food on your plate. Have him bring out the other half, in a doggy bag, with the check.

 

If you enjoy our articles and are seeking more information and direction, please go to Amazon and type in “Jeffry Weiss” or the specific book names.  Right now there are two books for sale:

Available now:

1) “Why we eat and why we keep eating: breaking your food addiction

2) “The Perfect Day.”

3) Available on or about 7/11/2015:  “The Caffeine Diet: sipping your way to slim.”

4) Available on or about 7/18/2015″  “Turning off the Hunger Gene”

5) Available on or about 7/25/2015:  “Warning!  Everything you’ve ever been told about dieting is wrong.”

 

 

If you have found our articles helpful, please visit Amazon to buy our books and support our good work.

Right now the following are available:

“Why we eat and why we keep eating: breaking your food addiction

“The Prefect Day.”

“The Caffeine Diet: sipping your way to slim”

Coming in three weeks:

“Turning off the hunger gene: food as medicine in the 21st century”

“Warning!  everything you’ve ever heard about dieting is wrong”

 

 

 

16 HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES TO BAD CHOICES

 

All five books in the “Why We Eat’ series are based on the REAL reasons we eat. programs that focus on low-carb diets, low fat diets, blood type diets, fasting, juicing, starving not only do not work but can cause severe and irreparable harm to you body AND mind. This program is does not depend upon exercising sixty or ninety minutes a day or sacrificing other aspects of your life. In fact, it emphasizes interaction with other and with nature as important aspects of the program. You will gain control not just of your appetite, but of your life.

 

Your article…

 

Sometimes it must feel like you’re General Custer, surrounded by fast-food restaurants and vending machines. But there are always alternatives – you just need to be creative. I can help you. Check out the list below.

Typical Food

1) Cheese

2) Jams/Jellies

2) White bread

3) Ground beef

4) Milk

5) French Fries Baked

6) Hamburger

7) White Rice

8) Alcohol

9) Eggs

8) Potato chips and other snack foods;

9) Commercial peanut butter

10) Sugar, high fructose corn syrup brown sugar

11) Canned fruit in heavy syrup.

12 Frozen vegetables in sauce.

13) Chicken with skin

14) Canned spaghetti sauce

15) Egg noodles

16) Butter and margarine

 

Healthy Alternative

1) Fat-free cheese, soy cheese

2) All-fruit spread

3) 100% whole wheat bread

4) Calcium-fortified soymilk

5) Sweet potato fries

6) Turkey burger made with ground turkey.

7) Brown rice, wild rice, bulgur, quinoa.

8) Fresh squeezed fruit juices.

9) natural peanut butter, soy butter, nut butters

10) Honey, dried fruit.

11) Canned fruit in its own juice

12) Plain frozen vegetables

13) Chicken breast without skin

14) Tomato paste

15) Whole-wheat noodles, spaghetti squash

16)) Olive oil, canola oil, fat-free butter substitutes.

 

If you enjoy our articles and are seeking more information and direction, please go to Amazon and type in “Jeffry Weiss” or the specific book names.  Right now there are two books for sale:

Available now:

1) “Why we eat and why we keep eating: breaking your food addiction

2) “The Perfect Day.”

3)  “The Caffeine Diet: sipping your way to slim.”

4) Available on or about 7/18/2015″  “Turning off the Hunger Gene”

5) Available on or about 7/25/2015:  “Warning!  Everything you’ve ever been told about dieting is wrong.”

TOP TEN EATING TIPS

 

All five books in the “Why We Eat’ series are based on the REAL reasons we eat. programs that focus on low-carb diets, low fat diets, blood type diets, fasting, juicing, starving not only do not work but can cause severe and irreparable harm to you body AND mind. This program is does not depend upon exercising sixty or ninety minutes a day or sacrificing other aspects of your life. In fact, it emphasizes interaction with other and with nature as important aspects of the program. You will gain control not just of your appetite, but of your life.

 Your article…

1 ) Eat a big breakfast, predominately made up of protein. (For every 100 calories of protein you eat, 20 calories are burned in the digestion process).

2) Eat good snacks. Don’t wait until you are hungry; by then, you have low blood sugar and the brain is screaming for food – especially in the form of sugar.

3) Eat a high-protein and/or high fiber snacks, like nuts or seeds. According to Durk Pearson and Sandy Shaw, protein, eaten thirty to forty-five minutes before main meals, can further reduce appetite. (Amino acids in the protein are converted within this time to norepinephrine – the appetite-inhibiting neurotransmitter).

3) Eat one or two vegetables with every meal. (Please don’t count French fries).

4) Get your calcium from soymilk or dark green vegetables. Avoid regular milk.

5) Don’t eat any potatoes except yams or sweet potatoes. White potatoes have a glycemic index higher than table sugar.

6) Eat a high quality protein with every meal.

7) When eating grains, eat only 100% whole grains – sparingly!

8) Eat fruit separately from other meals.

9) Drink six-8 ounces glasses of water per day (women), eight-8 ounce glasses per day (men), but not within 15 minutes before or after eating; otherwise, the saliva in your mouth is diluted and the digestion process is delayed.

10) Reduce or eliminate white sugar. Remember that fat-free usually means lots of sugar – a bad trade-off.

**********************************************************

If you enjoy our articles and are seeking more information and direction, please go to Amazon and type in “Jeffry Weiss” or the specific book names.  Right now there are two books for sale:

Available now:

1) “Why we eat and why we keep eating: breaking your food addiction

2) “The Perfect Day.”

3) Available on or about 7/11/2015:  “The Caffeine Diet: sipping your way to slim.”

4) Available on or about 7/18/2015″  “Turning off the Hunger Gene”

5) Available on or about 7/25/2015:  “Warning!  Everything you’ve ever been told about dieting is wrong.”