THE ROLE OF SLEEP AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO OBESITY

 

 

Normal sleep encompasses moving through four stages of sleep six times per night. Healthy sleep encompasses more REM sleep. The body repairs itself during stage three and four (non-REM) sleep. REM sleep allows the mind to process new information through the filters of past experience.

Growth hormone is released while we sleep – the vast majority within the first one and a half hours of sleep. Growth hormone is essential to a properly functioning immune system. When sugar is eaten late at night, it disrupts the body’s ability to manufacture growth hormone.

We are sleeping 20% less while working 158 more hours per year than our grand-parents. Less stable careers lead to more stress. A single night of poor sleep leads to a 20-30% decrease in immune system cells that fight cancer and viruses.

Further, researchers concluded that chronic sleep loss disrupts hormonal and metabolic systems. It was found that this could hasten the onset and increase the severity of diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity.

Sleep deprivation increases the production of Cortisol, which triggers the hypothalamus to activate the appetite. Insufficient sleep may interfere with the body’s ability to burn off carbs, causing spikes in blood sugar, putting the body into fat-storage mode. Chronic sleep deprivation disrupts hormonal and metabolic systems, leading to diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity. Finally, sleep increases appetite and slows down metabolize, making you pack on the pounds.

Solution: Sleep impacts our ability to think, to remember, the body’s ability to heal itself, our immune system and more. What’s the sense of working and studying more if you can’t function the next day? Take 3 mg. of melatonin ЛА hr. before bed. Sufficient sleep? 8 hours a night.

 

 

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